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One Lonely Cattle Joins Other Herd

Here is a post by Toramaru, one of the people who frequently goes inside the Fukushima nuclear no-go zone to rescue dogs and cats. He reports in here about one cattle that was removed from a barn where she was born, to join other herd.

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At one of cow barns inside the no-entry zone in Fukushima, there was a cattle that was born just after the disaster in March, 2011.

This female cattle was born around March 15, and was named ‘Ichigo (Strawberry)’. She was barely surviving for nearly 4 months.

In the environment where she lives, there is no other lives as you can see from the picture above.

She lives among deaths.

You’d think she should leave here as soon as possible.

But Ichigo only knows this place.

And it’s the place where Ichigo’s mother lays.

It’s a place where her mother sleeps. Ichigo wouldn’t want to leave this place.

This is the body of what is believed to be Ichigo’s mother.

Until Ichigo was able to eat on her own, I imagine she gave her milk till she was not able to and died.

Because of her mother, Ichigo was able to feed herself.

However, it doesn’t look like she would survive this way for too long.

One pasture owner who was worried about Ichigo said she should come to his pasture.

Some politicians and others were involved in this matter, and at last Ichigo can be transferred.

A huge truck for one cattle.

But it’s worth saving her life.

To carry a heavy life, a truck of this size was necessary.

This is Ichigo after she was transferred.

She was surprised to see a herd of cows for the first time in her life.

She will soon realize these cows are her kind, and live together.

In this field which is only one that exists within the 20km no-go zone.

The owner of this pasture told me that those cows in another barn that we thought already perished, were actually transferred here.  10 of them joined with this herd and are now living together.

With some lives saved, I thought the efforts by volunteers to let them live were paid off.

Their activities were absolutely not in vain.

We should not give up.

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6 responses to “One Lonely Cattle Joins Other Herd

  1. Hi voicingonbehalf,
    How come she was set free while the others were locked up? Was she eating the grass outside the barn to survive? Thanks.
    Sandy

  2. It’s wonderful this calf was rescued from near death.
    Why Ichigo wasn’t rescued sooner?
    Also why most of these cows we’ve seen around Fukushima were kept and left locked inside, tethered?

  3. Answer: because it’s more upsetting to show film of animals who died horribly than of the cattle wandering around.

  4. The reason why Ichigo was left alone for so long was that it’s a rule within the 20km no-go zone that farm animals can’t be removed from one place to another, because of the radiation problem, unless the government issues a permit.

    As for why some cows are locked inside while others are set free… This was the result of each farmer’s decision for what would be the best for the cows. Those that were set free could wander around looking for grass and many of them are still alive today. However, the short coming of this is that they are more exposed to radiation both outside (air) and inside their body (grass and water).

    As for those that were locked inside… Although they could avoid quite an amount of radiation compared to those set free, many have unfortunately died. However, there are also some barns where owners go back there and feed them on a regular basis still today. I’m not sure if it’s because not all farmers have permits or if those evacuated farmers could only find shelters far from Fukushima and/or they didn’t have the means to get inside…

  5. But Ichigo will be safe. 🙂

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